livingthrufaith

a blog about life, family, and faith

Chatsworth House

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After a crazy day of traveling, we woke up to a beautiful sunny & warmer day, which I’ve been told is a bit rare.  They pulled out the best just for us!  We decided Friday would be our day to tour Chatsworth House.  I had been looking forward to this since we first started planning our trip.  We had seen a documentary on the House and I couldn’t wait to see it in person. (Did you know one of the Pride & Prejudice movies was filmed here?!)

We made sandwiches and had a picnic lunch on the grounds by the Derwent River.  It was a lovely, quiet spot to begin our new day of adventure.

Derwent River - ChatsworthIMG_0043edited

IMG_0034editedHowever, to get to our bench we had to walk past a few lazy sheep that had been grazing on the grass, which meant that we walked with our eyes cast downward if you know what I mean.

IMG_0035editedDuring our lovely picnic, Donald joined us for a brief time waiting for a few handouts.  (Yes, I named him Donald.  Seemed appropriate.)

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We never did find out what this structure near the river was, but it was cool looking and had a garden on top.  The door was locked so we couldn’t step onto that part.

IMG_0038edited     IMG_0040edited IMG_0045editedThis is the hunting tower.  It was farther away than it looks, but you can hike up there if you wanted to.

IMG_0041editedAfter our picnic we hiked up to the main house to begin our tour.  We really enjoyed seeing all the historical displays and were amazed at the elaborate furnishings and paintings.  I do believe every ceiling was covered with a painting of some sort.  The moldings and intricate wood workings were beautiful and we learned a few of the stories of the family that has served as Dukes and Duchesses through out the years. The fourth Earl of Devonshire received the title of 1st Duke of Devonshire in recognition of helping William and Mary to the throne.  The current Duke and Duchess still live in Chatsworth; however, the estate is now owned by a trust.

IMG_0046edited IMG_0047edited IMG_0049editedThese first pictures are from what I believe was called the Great Hall.  From the floor to the ceiling, the stairs to the walls this room was exquisitely decorated.

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IMG_0051edited IMG_0113editedIf we are remembering correctly, it was the 6th Duke who was known for excessive spending and had the chapel built. The chapel is no longer used for religious ceremonies other than a few family Christenings.

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This is the balcony at the rear of the chapel.  Occasionally, the staff would join the family in a special service.  The staff would sit below, the family above.

IMG_0061editedThis was one of the walls in the room beside the chapel.  It was added on at the same time, but I did not hear what the room was called.  It was just as ornate as the chapel.

IMG_0056editedThe stairwells were just as elaborately decorated as any of the rooms.

IMG_0067editedA suite of rooms was built specifically to house the King & Queen when they visited.  Which King & Queen, I can’t really remember…

IMG_0070edited IMG_0076editedIMG_0080editedBehind this door is another door (where it leads, I haven’t a clue).  Can you guess if the violin is real?

IMG_0079editedThe knob is real.  The door is real.  The violin is painted to look like it is hanging on the door. This picture doesn’t do it justice, but it really looks like a violin is hanging on that door!

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This portrait of Duchess Georgina Spencer (the 5th duchess, I think), was quite scandalous for her time.  There was another portrait of the Duchess much more prim and proper farther down the hall.

IMG_0084editedOf course the library was Brian’s favorite room, even though we weren’t allowed in the main part.  There are over 30,000 books in the Chatsworth library although not all were housed in that room.  I read that the 2nd Duke Henry Cavendish was noted for recognition of the hydrogen element and was the first man to determine the density of the earth.  His collection of scientific papers are supposedly in the collection at Chatsworth.

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IMG_0118editedIt was hard to believe that one of the duchesses had a false ceiling constructed to close off this beautiful cupola in one of the stairwells. Why would you want to cover that up?!

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During WWII, Chatsworth was occupied by Penrhos College, a girl’s boarding school.  This dining room served as the dormitory.  Can you see that ceiling?!  Those are all flowers carved into the ceiling trimmed in gold.

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IMG_0124editedThis was the Coronation chair and footstool for George III (circa 1750).

IMG_0128editedNot all the chandeliers were girly…

IMG_0127editedAs much as we enjoyed the house, we both agreed the gardens were our favorite part.

IMG_0131editedIMG_0149editedIMG_0145editedBrian said that on some days you could see this fountain all the way to Cliff College.

IMG_0139edited IMG_0140edited IMG_0150editedThe stables now house a restaurant and some shops.  It’s supposedly pretty popular as a wedding venue.

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After all that walking, we walked around Chesterfield that evening and then had to have the traditional fish and chips take-away (take-out) for supper.

IMG_0171editedWe didn’t last long after supper.  Jet lag set in and off to bed we went.  Had to get some rest so we could visit Bakewell the next day…

Living thru faith,

Misty

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One thought on “Chatsworth House

  1. Pingback: Bakewell, Cliff, and Baslow’s Edge | livingthrufaith

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